Maria Von Trapp

World Music Singer

Maria Von Trapp was born in Vienna, Austria on January 26th, 1905 and is the World Music Singer. At the age of 82, Maria Von Trapp biography, profession, age, height, weight, eye color, hair color, build, measurements, education, career, dating/affair, family, news updates, and networth are available.

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Date of Birth
January 26, 1905
Nationality
United States, Austria
Place of Birth
Vienna, Austria
Death Date
Mar 28, 1987 (age 82)
Zodiac Sign
Aquarius
Profession
Musician, Screenwriter, Singer, Writer
Maria Von Trapp Height, Weight, Eye Color and Hair Color

At 82 years old, Maria Von Trapp physical status not available right now. We will update Maria Von Trapp's height, weight, eye color, hair color, build, and measurements.

Height
Not Available
Weight
Not Available
Hair Color
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Eye Color
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Build
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Measurements
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Maria Von Trapp Religion, Education, and Hobbies
Religion
Not Available
Hobbies
Not Available
Education
Not Available
Maria Von Trapp Spouse(s), Children, Affair, Parents, and Family
Spouse(s)
Georg Ritter von Trapp, ​ ​(m. 1927; died 1947)​
Children
3, including Johannes von Trapp plus 7 stepchildren
Dating / Affair
Not Available
Parents
Not Available
Maria Von Trapp Life

Baroness Maria Augusta von Trapp DHS (née Kutschera, 1905-March 1987) was the Trapp Family Singers' stepmother and matriarch.

The Story of the Trapp Family Singers, a 1950 West German film that was influenced by the Broadway musical The Sound of Music (1959) and its 1965 film version.

Early life

Maria was born on January 26, 1905, to Augusta (née Rainer) and Karl Kutschera. She was transported from her parents' village in Tyrol to a hospital in Vienna, Austria, on a train.

When she was two, her mother died of pneumonia. Maria's father, who was devastated by his death, left Maria with his niece (her foster mother) who had cared for Maria's half-brother after his mother died. Maria's father left the world but Maria would visit him in Vienna on occasion. Her father died when she was nine years old. Uncle Franz, her foster mother's son, later became her guardian.

Maria was not treated well by Uncle Franz, who was disciplined for conduct she did not do. (He later was discovered to be mentally impaired) Maria changed from the shy teen she was and, as an adult, she became the "class cut-up," figuring she may as well have fun if she were going to get into trouble either way. Maria continued to receive high marks despite this change.

Maria left high school at the age of 15, deciding to remain a mentor for children staying at nearby hotels. No one took her seriously because she seemed so young. Eventually, a hotelier asked her to be the umpire for a tennis tournament. Despite the fact that she did not know what an umpire was and had never played tennis, she took the job anyway.

She earned enough funds to enroll in the State Teachers College for Progressive Education in Vienna, where she also received a scholarship. She graduated from there at the age of 18, 1923.

She entered Nonnberg Abbey, a Benedictine monastery in Salzburg, as a postulant intending to become a nun in 1924.

Maria was recruited to teach one of the seven children (Maria Franziska) of widowed naval commander Georg von Trapp's widowed naval commander Georg von Trapp in 1926, although she was still a schoolteacher at the abbey. Agathe Whitehead, his wife, died of scarlet fever in 1922. Maria eventually began to look after the others (Rupert, Agathe, Werner, Hedwig, Johanna and Martina).

Despite being 25 years her senior, Captain von Trapp noticed how much she worried about his children and begged her to marry him. She was afraid and returned to Nonnberg Abbey to seek advice from the mother abbess, Virgilia Lütz, who told her that it was God's will that she marry him. She returned to the family and accepted his proposal. She wrote in her autobiography that she was terribly ill on her wedding day, both at God and with her new husband, because what she really wanted was to be a nun. "I honestly and completely was not in love." I liked him but I didn't love him. However, I loved the children so much that I actually married the children. I learned to love him more than I had ever loved before or after." They were married on November 26, 1927, and had three children together: Rosmarie (1929-2022), Eleonore ("Lorli") (1931-2021) and Johannes (born 1939).

The Von Trapps loved hiking. They stayed overnight at a farmer's house on one outing. Two of his daughters had scarlet fever by the next morning. Maria, Johanna, and Martina, Georg's children, were infected with Maria, Johanna, and Martina. Johanna and Martina recovered, but dehydrated Maria suffered kidney stones. Maria, Maria's stepdaughter, accompanied her to Vienna for a fruitful surgery, but Maria suffered with lifelong kidney disease.

In 1935, the family was in the midst of financial hardship. Georg moved his funds from a bank in London to an Austrian bank managed by a friend named Frau Lammer. Due to the Crash of 1929 and Lammer's bank's failure, Austria was facing economic difficulties during a worldwide depression. The Trapps converted the majority of their servants to survive, and rented out the remaining rooms. Father Franz Wasner, the Archbishop of Salzburg, told him to remain as their chaplain, and this began their singing career.

Soprano Lotte Lehmann heard the family perform, and she suggested they appear at concerts. When the Austrian Chancellor Kurt Schuschnigg heard them on the radio, he invited them to perform in Vienna.

They became a well-known touring act after appearing at a festival in 1935. They lived under the Nazis after Germany's annexation of Austria by 1938. As they witnessed hostility against Jewish children by their peers, the use of children against their parents, and the promotion of abortion by Maria's doctor and son's school, eventually culminating in Georg's induction into the German Navy. They visited Munich in 1938 and came across Hitler at a restaurant. The family left Austria in September and then moved to Italy, then England, and eventually to the United States. Heinrich Himmler's headquarters used their abandoned home as a Nazi cemetery.

The von Trapps began performing in the United States and Canada, initially calling themselves the "Trapp Family Choir." On December 10, 1938, they appeared at The Town Hall in New York City.

The New York Times wrote:

Charles Wagner was their first booking agent, but Frederick Christian Schang followed them. Schang Americanized their repertoire, and the group renamed themselves "Trapp Family Singers" after he suggested it. The family, which by then had ten children, was touring the country giving concerts. Alix Williamson served as the group's publicist for more than two decades. They established the Trapp Family Austrian Relief Fund, which sent food and clothing to people impoverished in Austria following the war.

The family moved to Stowe, Vermont, where they operated a music camp when they were not touring. Maria Augusta, Maria Franziska, Johanna, Martina, Hedwig, and Agathe applied for US citizenship in 1944, although Georg never applied to become a citizen. Rupert and Werner became citizens in World War II, while Rosmarie and Eleonore became citizens by virtue of their mother's citizenship. During a concert tour in Philadelphia on January 17th, 1939, Johannes was born in the United States. Georg von Trapp died in Vermont in 1947 after suffering from lung cancer.

In the 1950s, the family owned a series of 78-rpm records for RCA Victor, some of which were later released on RCA Camden LPs. A few later albums on LPs were also released on CDs, including some stereo sessions. The Trapp Family Singers disbanded 1957 and split in separate directions. Maria and three of her children became missionaries in Papua New Guinea. Maria moved back to Vermont to run the Trapp Family Lodge, which had been named Cor Unum since 1965. She started handing over the lodge's care to her son Johannes, but she was initially reluctant to do so. Hedwig returned to Austria and worked as a tutor in Umhausen.

Source

Maria Von Trapp Career

Start of musical career and departure from Austria.

Soprano Lotte Lehmann heard the family perform, and she suggested that they appear at concerts. Kurt Schuschnigg, the Austrian Chancellor, heard them on the radio and invited them to perform in Vienna.

They became a well-known touring act after appearing at a festival in 1935. They lived under Nazi rule after Germany's annexation of Austria in March 1938. Women's life became more difficult as they witnessed hostility against Jewish children by their parents' use of children against their parents, the promotion of abortion rights both by Maria's doctor and by her son's kindergarten, and finally, with Georg's incorporation into the German Navy. They visited Munich in 1938 and met Hitler at a restaurant. The family left Austria and moved to Italy in September, followed by England, and finally the United States. Heinrich Himmler's headquarters made use of their abandoned home as the Nazis' headquarters.

The von Trapps began to perform in the United States and Canada, originally calling themselves the "Trapp Family Choir." On December 10, 1938, they appeared at The Town Hall in New York City.

The New York Times wrote:

Charles Wagner was their first booking agent, but Frederick Christian Schang was their next step forward. Schang Americanized their repertoire, and the group renamed the group "Trapp Family Singers" after he suggested it. The family, who by then had ten children, were soon touring the world for concert performances. Alix Williamson served as the group's publicist for more than two decades. They established the Trapp Family Austrian Relief fund, which distributed food and clothing to people impoverished in Austria after the war.

The family migrated to Stowe, Vermont, where they operated a music camp when they weren't touring. Maria Augusta, Maria Franziska, Johanna, Martina, Hedwig, and Agathe applied for American citizenship in 1944, but Georg did not apply to become a citizen. Rupert and Werner became citizens after serving in World War II, while Rosmarie and Eleonore became citizens by virtue of their mother's citizenship. During a concert tour in Philadelphia, Johannes was born on January 17th, 1939. Georg von Trapp died in Vermont in 1947 after suffering from lung cancer.

In the 1950s, the family owned a number of 78-rpm records for RCA Victor, some of which were later released on RCA Camden LPs. A few later recordings were also released on LPs, as well as some stereo sessions. The Trapp Family Singers disbanded and went their separate ways in 1957. Maria and three of her children were sent by Papua New Guinea to serve as missionaries. Maria returned to Vermont in 1965 to head the Trapp Family Lodge, which had been named Cor Unum. Even though she was initially reluctant to do so, she soon began handing over the lodge to her son Johannes. Hedwig returned to Austria and began as a Umhausen tutor.

Source

William's first love: How the Prince of Wales and Ian Farquhar's singer daughter Rose dated after he finished his A Levels at Eton and remained close friends - and the future King even went to her wedding

www.dailymail.co.uk, March 8, 2024
After more than 20 years together, the Prince and Princess of Wales will celebrate their 13th wedding anniversary next month. However, William dated Rose Farquhar, the Prince's first serious girlfriend, right before he met Kate while studying at St. Andrews. Since meeting at Beaufort Polo Club in Gloucestershire after the future King completed his A-levels at Eton, the pair dated back in 2000. Rose is the youngest daughter of Captain Ian Farquhar, the former master of the Beaufort Hunt who died at the age of 78. She is pictured left at her wedding reception, right on the Voice. Inset: William at her wedding