Emily Watson

Movie Actress

Emily Watson was born in Islington, London, England, United Kingdom on January 14th, 1967 and is the Movie Actress. At the age of 57, Emily Watson biography, profession, age, height, weight, eye color, hair color, build, measurements, education, career, dating/affair, family, news updates, movies, TV shows, and networth are available.

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Other Names / Nick Names
Emily Margaret Watson, Emily
Date of Birth
January 14, 1967
Nationality
United Kingdom
Place of Birth
Islington, London, England, United Kingdom
Age
57 years old
Zodiac Sign
Capricorn
Networth
$10 Million
Profession
Actor, Film Actor, Stage Actor, Television Actor
Emily Watson Height, Weight, Eye Color and Hair Color

At 57 years old, Emily Watson has this physical status:

Height
173cm
Weight
60kg
Hair Color
Dark Brown
Eye Color
Blue
Build
Slim
Measurements
Not Available
Emily Watson Religion, Education, and Hobbies
Religion
She was raised as an Anglican.
Hobbies
Not Available
Education
University of Bristol
Emily Watson Spouse(s), Children, Affair, Parents, and Family
Spouse(s)
Jack Waters ​(m. 1995)
Children
2
Dating / Affair
Jack Waters (1995-Present)
Parents
Richard Watson, Katharine
Emily Watson Life

Emily Margaret Watson (born 14 January 1967) is an English actress.

She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress in Lars von Trier's Breaking the Waves (1996) and her role as Jacqueline du Pré in Hilary and Jackie (1998), earning the BIFA Award for Best Actress for the latter.

Janet Leach was named Best Actress in the 2011 ITV television biopic Appropriate Adult. Watson began her career on stage and joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1992.

She appeared in Twelfth Night and Uncle Vanya at the Donmar Warehouse in 2002 and was nominated for the 2003 Olivier Award for the latter.

The Boxer (1997), Angela's Ashes (1999), Gosford Park (2001), Peter Sellers' Life and Death (2004), Red Dragon (2002), Miss Potter (2005), War Horse (2004), The Golden Circle (2017).

She was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award and a Golden Globe Award for her role in the acclaimed HBO miniseries Chernobyl.

Early life

Watson was born in London. Richard Watson, her father, was an architect, and Katharine (née Venables), her mother, was an English tutor at St David's Girls' School in West London. She was born in Anglican and was raised as an Anglican. She has referred to her childhood as a "good middle-class English girl"... I'd love to say that I was a rebellious adolescent, but I wasn't.' She was a childhood friend of actress and writer Clara Salaman, and she appeared in the film version of Salaman's book Too Close.

Watson was educated at St James Independent Schools in west London, which were established by the School of Economic Science. Whilst there, she witnessed "instances of extreme cruelty" that were "very scary for people going forward in their lives." She obtained a BA (1988, English), at the University of Bristol, where she earned a BA (1988, England). She later earned an MA (2003, honorary) from Bristol University. Watson later studied at Drama Studio London.

Watson was a student at the University of Economic Science until 1996, but she was dismissed after her participation in Breaking the Waves at the age of 29. She describes the organization as a "very authoritarian regime" and a "system where you were supposed to think a certain way and you weren't really allowed to think any other way." It was a "very strong release" in her life that she was able to get out of it, she says.

Personal life

Watson married Jack Waters, who had appeared at the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1995. They have a daughter who was born in 2005 and a son who was born in 2009. They live in Greenwich, London.

Hours before filming in Oranges and Sunshine began, her mother became sick with encephalitis. Watson returned to London but only after her death.

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Emily Watson Career

Theatrical career

Watson's career began on the stage. The Children's Hour (at the Royal National Theatre), Three Sisters, Much Ado About Nothing, and The Lady from the Sea are among her theatre credits. Watson has also worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company, The Taming of the Shrew, All's Well That Ends Well, and The Changeling.

She took time off from cinema to appear in two parts in Sam Mendes' repertory performances of Uncle Vanya and Twelfth Night in London, first at Mendes' Donmar Warehouse in London and then at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Uncle Vanya's performance was widely praised on both directions of the Atlantic, and she was nominated for an Olivier Award nomination for her Uncle Vanya.

Film career

Watson was almost unknown before director Lars von Trier selected her to star in Breaking the Waves (1996) after Helena Bonham Carter dropped out. Watson's appearance as Bess McNeill received the Los Angeles, London, and New York Critics' Circle Award for Best Actress, as well as the National Society of Film Critics' Award for Best Actress and nominations at the Academy Awards, the British Academy Film Awards, and the Golden Globe Awards.

Watson appeared in another controversial role, that of cellist Jacqueline du Pré in Hilary and Jackie, for which she learned to play the cello in three months and received another Oscar nomination. She also appeared in Cradle Will Rock, a tale of a theatre performance in the 1930s directed by Tim Robbins, who was also a principal cast member of a leading role. Despite winning the title role of Frank McCourt's mother in the film version of his acclaimed memoir, Angela's Ashes, the film underperformed. In 2001, she appeared with John Turturro in The Luzhin Defence and in Robert Altman's ensemble piece Gosford Park.

She appeared in The Silence of the Lambs prequel, Red Dragon, as Adam Sandler's romantic passion in Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love and in the sci-fi action thriller Equilibrium with Christian Bale the following year.

Watson received a Golden Globe Award for her role as Peter Sellers' first wife, Anne Howe, in the HBO film The Life and Death of Peter Sellers. Watson appeared in four films in 2005: Wah-Wah, Richard E. Grant's autobiographical directorial debut; Separate Lies, directed by Gosford Park writer Julian Fellowes; Tim Burton's animated film Corpse Bride with Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter; and John Hillcoat's Australian-set "western," The Prosecutors.

Watson appeared in Miss Potter, a biographical drama about children's author Beatrix Potter starring Ewan McGregor and Renée Zellweger, as well as an adaptation of Thea Beckman's Children's book Crusade in Jeans. In 2007, she appeared in The Water Horse: Legend of the Deep, a Dick King-Smith children's book about the origins of the Loch Ness Monster.

Watson appeared in Fireflies in the Garden, the Lifetime Television film The Memory Keeper's Daughter (based on the book's name), and in screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's debut, Synecdoche, New York, in 2008. She appeared in the film Cold Souls, directed Sophie Barthes, and Within the Whirlwind, a biographical film about Russian poet and Gulag survivor Evgenia Ginzburg from The Luzhin Defence director Marleen Gorris in 2009. Watson considers Ginzburg's latest work; however, the film was not selected for release.

She starred in Oranges and Sunshine, a film retelling the true story of children transferred to foster care homes in Australia starring Jim Loach and then starring War Horse, Michael Morpurgo's award-winning book directed by Steven Spielberg, in 2010. Janet Leach appeared in the ITV two-part film Appropriate Adult, about serial killer Fred West, for which she received a BAFTA award.

Watson appeared in The Book Thief, Geoffrey Rush and Sophie Nélisse, and The Theory of Everything, Oscar-nominated film starring Jane Wilde, Hawking's mother in law, as well as Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones. She appeared in Testament of Youth, alongside Alicia Vikander and Kit Harington, Eduardo Verástegui's Little Boy and A Royal Night Out, in which she portrayed Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. Experts also praised Julie Nicholson's performance in the BBC Drama A Song for Jenny, with experts predicting her to win the British Academy Television Award for Best Actress.

In the miniseries Chernobyl, she appeared as a nuclear scientist, a composite of many real scientists.

In the 2015 New Year Honours, Watson was named Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE). Apple Tree Yard, a BBC mini-series, starred in 2017.

Capitol Films optioned Mood Indigo, a script co-written by Watson and her husband in 2007, to be optioned in 2007. The film is a love tale set during the Second World War and concerns about a young woman who falls in love with a pilot.

Amélie for Watson was written by director Jean-Pierre Jeunet, but she had to withdraw due to a lack of French and a desire not to be far away from home. Audrey Tautou's role was portrayed by a famous actress. Elizabeth I was also the first choice to appear Elizabeth I in Shekhar Kapur's film Elizabeth, winning Cate Blanchett an Academy Award nomination.

Due to the similarity of their names, Emma Watson, the actor who plays Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter film series, is often confused with her. She has confirmed that she does not discipline anyone who makes the mistake because she is "quite flattered" that people think she is 21 years old.

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Inside Britain's prison sex epidemic: Veteran officers reveal the 'cold hard truth' about what's driving a huge rise in guard-inmate relations - and say it is just the tip of the iceberg

www.dailymail.co.uk, July 3, 2024
Just two months ago, an urgent warning was sounded about the state of Britain's second biggest prison. Chief inspector of prisons Charlie Taylor did not hold back in his excoriating assessment of conditions at category B Wandsworth Prison. In a long and damning list of areas of concern, he noted there were 'ongoing failings in security, severe overcrowding, vermin, drugs, violence and rising self-harm'. 'Relationships between staff and prisoners were poor or non-existent,' he said, noting that most staff at 'every level' were inexperienced. How ironic the latter remark seems now, given recent events behind the Victorian facade of the South London jail. For Wandsworth Prison, built in 1851 (it was intended for 964 inhabitants and now holds 1,513 men) has been catapulted into the spotlight again in recent days, courtesy of a tawdry viral video clip, that would appear to have been filmed in one of those self-same overcrowded cells.

Why DO so many female prison officers fall for cons behind bars? Explicit video from Wandsworth prison is latest example as number of behind-bars relationships jumps by 50 per cent

www.dailymail.co.uk, June 29, 2024
In the three years to March 2023, 31 female prison staff working in male prisons were sacked, including one who gave birth to her inmate lover's baby and another who had his cell number tattooed on her thigh. It is more than 50 per cent rise on the 19 women sacked in the previous four-year period, and that figure doesn't include incidents recorded at private prisons, run by companies such as G4S, Serco and Sodexo. But according to those who have worked in the system, instances of sex inside jail like the shocking example at Wandsworth prison is just the tip of the iceberg. One former prison officer, previously told the Mail: 'The numbers will be much, much higher than the figures that have emerged because these events are swept under the carpet. If a sexual relationship ever comes to light, then normally the prison officer is given the chance to resign. They don't like this stuff to come out, it's hugely embarrassing.' To an outsider, it's hard to understand what drives an officer to risk an affair with an inmate, knowing they could lose everything if they are caught. So what exactly is going on behind prison walls?

JAN MOIR: These puffed-up luvvie popinjays are deluded to think their world will be rosier under Labour

www.dailymail.co.uk, June 28, 2024
Uh oh. The luvvies are on the march. They are as mad as hell and they aren't going to take it any more. One week before the General Election, when Labour is zooming ahead in the polls like the Tardis streaking through time and space towards the glorious new socialist nirvana of Planet Starmer, a puffed-up platoon of pan-sticked popinjays have nailed their political colours to the mast. And they have come out in favour of - brace yourselves, you're not going to believe this - the Labour Party. I know! One hundred and thirty one luvvie signatories have sent an open letter to The Times newspaper hailing the advent of a Labour government, published yesterday.